August 2017


As you read these words, my family and I will be in the big middle of our life-changing trip to Vietnam. By this time, barring any hiccups along the way, we will have taken custody of our Esther Noelle, and be finalizing all the details to bring her to her new home, AMERICA!

For many who are reading this Vietnam is a blip on the history channel, a bad memory of a rough time, or the source of some pretty amazing Asian cuisine. I would like to share with you some spiritual points that you can use to make this small corner of the world a part of your daily prayer cycle:

The country is increasingly opening up as economic progress continues. Most of the population was born after the Vietnam War and are more interested in capital gain and the outside world than Communist propaganda. They are proving responsive to the gospel – for reasons good and bad. At the same time, newfound prosperity has opened the door to rampant materialism and other competing ideologies. Pray that the Truth might be clearly and effectively proclaimed, particularly among the growing masses of young professionals.

All open Protestant missionary work ceased in 1975. CMA had laboured for 64 years (for 50 years as the only Protestant mission). Other agencies arrived in the 1950s, notably WEC, IMB, and UWM. In 1974 there were 280 missionaries in South Vietnam from about 20 organizations. Those years of sowing are today reaping an abundant harvest. Current economic development gives opportunity for Christians in business as well as for English teachers. Christian NGOs who propose legitimate aid projects are increasingly invited to work here. Literally hundreds of organizations from both Asia and the West now claim some kind of work in Vietnam. Many of these organizations work in deliberate partnership together. Pray that Vietnam may become fully open to Christian workers, and that many committed and prepared workers may respond. (from Operation World)

At the Name of Jesus every knee shall bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth.”  — Philippians 2:10

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A picture is worth a thousand words. I’m not sure whether that is Shakespeare or someone much older than the Bard, but if in our mind’s eye we can catch an illustration to attach meaning to the words we hear, then we really begin to grasp the concept.

Take baptism for instance. Many people of the world would see this action as a ritual practiced by the very religious. But baptism is a graphic picture of what has already happened. In undergoing the ordinance of baptism, a believer is visually shouting that they believe the Jesus Christ died for their sins, was buried, and then rose again to provide life. The picture also depicts the joining up of the believer with Jesus—now being dead to sin, buried with Him, and raised to walk in a new life with Jesus. That’s a significant picture—worth a thousand words.

Another super picture of spiritual life and walking with Jesus is the one provided by adoption. We were not born into the family of God. Sure, He created us. And He loves us. But in order for us to be fully and truly His, He had to identify us, choose us, and pay an exorbitant price for our adoption.

In the process of adoption, prospective parents make a determined decision to welcome someone into their family. They identify a child in need, choose them, and then pay a long, arduous, and even sacrificial price to make that child fully and truly their own. In many respects, our adopted children are tied more strongly to us than had they been born into the family.

God offers this picture of adoption to us to help us realize how important our eternity is to Him, how desperate He is to make us His own, and to what extravagant lengths (even to the dying on a cross) He is willing to go to finalize our adoption into His family.

Have you accepted God’s gift of adoption? Have you thanked Him for adopting you? Have you shown it through the picture of baptism?

For in Christ Jesus you are all sons of God, through faith. — Galatians 3:26

I was twelve years old when God placed a particular call on my life. A junior high student in Kemp, Texas, I put aside my grandiose plans of being either a homicide detective or a cracker-jack lawyer and surrendered to be a minister of the Gospel. From that humble (and humbling) moment God has led me on an interesting story that turns pages almost as often as a good novel switches chapters.

One of the most exhilarating chapters of my story set my boots on foreign soil. It was the turn of my call from minister to missionary that crossed my path with my Blushing Bride. And then we got to experience the adventure of sink or swim cultural immersion in the former soviet state of Ukraine. My heart for missions expanded during those short years, and one of my constant prayers is that I can continue to keep my spiritual eyes focused on the big picture that God has: seeing all nations of the world have an opportunity to trust His plan of salvation through Jesus Christ, His Son.

That same calling that put me in service of the church, then drafted me for international service, eventually brought me back to American soil to continue my ministry. Included in that ministry has been the heart-wrenching, hope-finding journey to adoption—a mission field in itself. This week I pray, while a real-life missionary fills my pulpit, that I will keep my eyes opened to Gospel opportunities while we are again in a foreign land for the express purpose of meeting and receiving our new baby, Esther Noelle Potter.

I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus.”  — Philippians 3:14

In recent months, I have heard of and/or counseled with friends (fellow pastors) who have faced discouragement, firings, or left the ministry altogether because of struggles with discord in their church, personal burn-out, or any variety of other issues. As I look back over these months, I think of how stressful and difficult it is to be a local church leader in our day and age.

In a time when it is more fashionable to let church commitment be a matter of convenience rather than conviction; when members are looking for all manner of reasons to excuse their lax attitudes; when society at large has all but turned her back on the church (making decisions to make church a preference rather than a persistence all the easier), it is no wonder that those who are called to spend their lives and their livelihood in God’s service are feeling crushed to the point of abandonment.

In such a time as this, it is more important than ever for us to rally together to lift up our leaders in prayer. Pray for lay leaders who volunteer their time to prepare and guide Bible study lessons on a weekly basis. Pray for others who fill important places of leadership within the local congregation. Pray for staff members who have given their lives to a calling (whether they serve in volunteer, part-time, or career-level capacity). Pray for all the spiritual leaders that you can think of for protection from the battles they face. Particularly pray for your pastor (and other local pastors) who feel the pull away from their calling often.

Therefore, pray to the Lord of the harvest to send out workers into His harvest.”  —Jesus, Matthew 9:38