Kurt Vonnegut starts his story “Harrison Bergeron” with these words:

The year was 2081, and everybody was finally equal. They weren’t only equal before God and the law. They were equal every which way. Nobody was smarter than anybody else. Nobody was better looking than anybody else. Nobody was stronger or quicker than anybody else. All this equality was due to the 211th, 212th, and 213th Amendments to the Constitution, and to the unceasing vigilance of agents of the United States Handicapper General.

The story goes on to tell how life is perfectly equal in 2081, but the reader gets the sense that, though it is equal, it may not be fair or just. Justice doesn’t mean that everyone is exactly alike, but it means that everyone has an opportunity to survive and to thrive.

When we act in justice to those around us, righteousness is both defended and advanced. When injustice runs rampant, people lose hope and dignity.

God has asked us (as His people) to deal justly, or rightly, with the world around us. That means when we see the injustice of the weak being usurped by the strong, we stand up. It means that when we hear of those less fortunate than ourselves, we readily give something of ourselves to make their life a little more just. Crime happens when justice is ignored. Right happens when we follow the justice of the Lord.

Do not judge, so that you won’t be judged. For you will be judged by the same standard with which you judge others, and you will be measured by the same measure you use. —Matthew 7:1-2